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My take on two luxury hotels in Tokyo

My take on two luxury hotels in Tokyo

I have never watched the movie Lost in Translation, believe it or not, but I had the chance of staying at the Park Hyatt Tokyo, where the movie was shot, for two nights, and then two nights at the The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho, a Luxury Collection Hotel (part of Marriott's family of brands). 

As you probably know by reading my profile, I work for Marriott International, and when I travel I enjoy staying in our hotels to get to know the different brands we have in the portfolio. I also take the chance to do some benchmarking and stay in hotels from other brands, such as Hyatt, Hilton, among others, to experience their service and product. I definitely learn a lot by visiting hotels.

Here is my take on the Park Hyatt Tokyo and The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho:

  • Both are luxury hotels, in high-rise buildings. I have the feeling that if you are not staying in a traditional ryokan, you will probably stay in a high-rise building. That being said, the chances of having amazing views are pretty high. Check the views below from our room at the Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho:
Bedroom views from The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho

Bedroom views from The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho

  • Bars/Restaurants: what makes the Park Hyatt Tokyo special is definitely the New York Bar, which has jazz bands and incredible views. There is a cover charge of $25 if you are not staying there and drinks are ~$20 or more. We loved the bar atmosphere.
New York Bar, at the Park Hyatt Tokyo

New York Bar, at the Park Hyatt Tokyo

The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho has a very cool bar as well, the Sky Gallery Lounge Levita, on the 35th floor, with incredible views of the Tokyo Tower and great drinks. 

  • Turndown services: luxury hotels usually offer turndown services, which mean that housekeeping will stop by to prepare your bedroom for your night of sleep – usually leaving slippers by the bed and a traditional Japanese kimono. Both hotels offer turndown services. 
  • Spa/Pool: what I didn’t like about the Park Hyatt is that they charge an extra $40 per person if you want to use spa facilities (or a package, that I explain below). The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho doesn’t charge for that and the facilities are pretty nice. I loved the gym of the Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho.
  • Room amenities & design: amenities offered are very similar (tea kettle, coffee, kimono, slippers…). The Park Hyatt had Aesop items, which I think are incredible, and The Prince Gallery had Remede Spa items, which smell great (and were also my favorite when I visited the St. Regis in Deer Valley). The room itself is older in the Park Hyatt, specially the furniture, and the window is much smaller. We didn't like that the Park Hyatt had hard keys. Photos below - room at the Prince Gallery and then some details from the Park Hyatt - photos from my Iphone, not very good resolution. 
  • In terms of price, you can do Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho with Marriott Rewards points and The Park Hyatt you can use Hyatt points. If you are not using points, I believe rates vary between $300-$1000 or more a night (Park Hyatt seems to be pricier, but any luxury hotel in Tokyo is!).
  • Some cool things I found out about the Park Hyatt: they offer you a package when you check in – for $60 per person you can pick 2 out of 3 items – breakfast, access to spa or 2 drinks at the bar. We didn’t opt in but I thought that was a good idea to bundle items. It is very rare to find free breakfast in luxury hotels – you can usually get when you have status in loyalty programs and access to concierge lounge.

Overall, both hotels were super nice, but what I enjoyed in the Park Hyatt the most was the bar. That being said, you don’t need to stay there to access the bar. As I mentioned, you can pay $25 per person and experience the famous Lost in Translation spot.

Location-wise, I think the Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho is better located, because it is closer to many metro stations. The Park Hyatt is close to Shinjuku, which is a massive train/metro station, but you still need to walk at least 15 minutes. In the image below, on the left, you can see the Park Hyatt location, very close to Shinjuku and Shibuya (where you can see the famous "Shibuya Crossing"). The Prince Gallery, on the right, is closer to Tsujiki Market (the fish market), Senso-Ji temple, among other spots.

hotellocation

To make our life easier, since Tokyo is so big, we tried to do all that was closer to the Park Hyatt when we stayed there, and all that was closer to the Prince Gallery when we were there, saving us time in the metro. In the next post I will share more about our itinerary, developed by Go Journy - get a free day of itinerary planning with Go Journy here.

Do you enjoy visiting new hotels and exploring different hotel brands? Which one is your favorite?

Views are my own. They do not reflect those of Marriott International.

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